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Recent Publications

2017

Journal Article

  • BESSON P., BANDT S. K., PROIX T., LAGARDE S., JIRSA V. K., RANJEVA J. - P., BARTOLOMEI F., GUYE M. “Anatomic consistencies across epilepsies: a stereotactic-EEG informed high-resolution structural connectivity study.”. Brain: A Journal of Neurology [En ligne]. 1 October 2017. Vol. 140, n°10, p. 2639-2652. Disponible sur : < http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awx181 > (consulté le no date)
    Mots-clés : brain networks, crmbm, diffusion weighted imaging, epilepsy, SEEG, snc, structural connectivity.

  • BYDDER M., RAPACCHI S., GIRARD O., GUYE M., RANJEVA J. - P. “Trimmed autocalibrating k-space estimation based on structured matrix completion.”. Magnetic Resonance Imaging [En ligne]. 15 July 2017. Vol. 43, p. 88-94. Disponible sur : < http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mri.2017.07.015 > (consulté le no date)
    Résumé : PURPOSE: Parallel imaging allows the reconstruction of undersampled data from multiple coils. This provides a means to reject and regenerate corrupt data (e.g. from motion artefact). The purpose of this work is to approach this problem using the SAKE parallel imaging method. THEORY AND METHODS: Parallel imaging methods typically require calibration by fully sampling the center of k-space. This is a challenge in the presence of corrupted data, since the calibration data may be corrupted which leads to an errors-in-variables problem that cannot be solved by least squares or even iteratively reweighted least squares. The SAKE method, based on matrix completion and structured low rank approximation, was modified to detect and trim these errors from the data. RESULTS: Simulated and actual corrupted datasets were reconstructed with SAKE, the proposed approach and a more standard reconstruction method (based on solving a linear equation) with a data rejection criterion. The proposed approach was found to reduce artefacts considerably in comparison to the other two methods. CONCLUSION: SAKE with data trimming improves on previous methods for reconstructing images from grossly corrupted data.
    Mots-clés : Artefacts, crmbm, IRLS, Parallel imaging, Robust, snc, Structured low rank approximation.

  • CHATEL B., HOURDé C., GONDIN J., FOURé A., LE FUR Y., VILMEN C., BERNARD M., MESSONNIER L. A., BENDAHAN D. “Impaired muscle force production and higher fatigability in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.”. Blood Cells, Molecules & Diseases [En ligne]. 11 January 2017. Vol. 63, p. 37-44. Disponible sur : < http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bcmd.2017.01.004 > (consulté le no date)
    Résumé : Skeletal muscle function has been scarcely investigated in sickle cell disease (SCD) so that the corresponding impact of sickle hemoglobin is still a matter of debate. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle force production and fatigability in SCD and to identify whether exercise intensity could have a modulatory effect. Ten homozygous sickle cell (HbSS), ten control (HbAA) and ten heterozygous (HbAS) mice were submitted to two stimulation protocols (moderate and intense) to assess force production and fatigability. We showed that specific maximal tetanic force was lower in HbSS mice as compared to other groups. At the onset of the stimulation period, peak force was reduced in HbSS and HbAS mice as compared to HbAA mice. Contrary to the moderate protocol, the intense stimulation protocol was associated with a larger decrease in peak force and rate of force development in HbSS mice as compared to HbAA and HbAS mice. These findings provide in vivo evidence of impaired muscle force production and resistance to fatigue in SCD. These changes are independent of muscle mass. Moreover, SCD is associated with muscle fatigability when exercise intensity is high.
    Mots-clés : crmbm, Exercise intensity, msk, Muscle mass, Muscle volume, Rate of force development.


  • CHATEL B., MESSONNIER L. A., BENDAHAN D. “Exacerbated in vivo metabolic changes suggestive of a spontaneous muscular vaso-occlusive crisis in exercising muscle of a sickle cell mouse.”. Blood Cells, Molecules, and Diseases [En ligne]. 1 June 2017. Vol. 65, p. 56-59. Disponible sur : < http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bcmd.2017.05.006 > (consulté le 18 August 2017)
    Résumé : While sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by frequent vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC), no direct observation of such an event in skeletal muscle has been performed in vivo. The present study reported exacerbated in vivo metabolic changes suggestive of a spontaneous muscular VOC in exercising muscle of a sickle cell mouse. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of phosphorus 31, phosphocreatine and inorganic phosphate concentrations and intramuscular pH were measured throughout two standardized protocols of rest – exercise – recovery at two different intensities in ten SCD mice. Among these mice, one single mouse presented divergent responses. A statistical analysis (based on confidence intervals) revealed that this single mouse presented slower phosphocreatine resynthesis and inorganic phosphate disappearance during the post-stimulation recovery of one of the protocols, what could suggest an ischemia. This study described, for the first time in a sickle cell mouse in vivo, exacerbated metabolic changes triggered by an exercise session that would be suggestive of a live observation of a muscular VOC. However, no evidence of a direct cause-effect relationship between exercise and VOC has been put forth.
    Mots-clés : crmbm, HbS polymerization, Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of phosphorus 31, msk, Physical activity, Red blood cell sickling.

  • DESROIS M., LAN C., MOVASSAT J., BERNARD M. “Reduced up-regulation of the nitric oxide pathway and impaired endothelial and smooth muscle functions in the female type 2 diabetic goto-kakizaki rat heart.”. Nutrition & Metabolism [En ligne]. 2017. Vol. 14, p. 6. Disponible sur : < http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12986-016-0157-z > (consulté le no date)
    Résumé : BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes is associated with greater relative risk of cardiovascular diseases in women than in men, which is not well understood. Consequently, we have investigated if male and female displayed differences in cardiac function, energy metabolism, and endothelial function which could contribute to increased cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetic female. METHODS: Male and female Control and type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) isolated rat hearts were perfused during 28 min with a physiological buffer before freeze-clamping for biochemical assays. High energy phosphate compounds and intracellular pH were followed using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy with simultaneous measurement of contractile function. Nitric oxide (NO) pathway and endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilatations were measured as indexes of endothelial function. Results were analyzed via two-way ANOVA, p < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS: Myocardial function was impaired in male and female diabetic versus Control groups (p < 0.05) without modification of energy metabolism. Coronary flow was decreased in both diabetic versus Control groups but to a higher extent in female GK versus male GK rat hearts (p < 0.05). NO production was up-regulated in diabetic groups but to a less extent in female GK rat hearts (p < 0.05). Endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilatations were impaired in female GK rat compared with male GK (p < 0.05) and female Control (p < 0.05) rat hearts. CONCLUSIONS: We reported here an endothelial damage characterized by a reduced up-regulation of the NO pathway and impaired endothelial and smooth muscle functions, and coronary flow rates in the female GK rat hearts while energy metabolism was normal. Whether these results are related to the higher risk of cardiovascular complications among type 2 diabetic female needs to be further elicited in the future.
    Mots-clés : Cardiac function, crmbm, cvs, Endothelial function, Energy Metabolism, Gender differences, Type 2 diabetic heart.
  • DONADIEU M., LE FUR Y., MAAROUF A., GHERIB S., RIDLEY B., PINI L., RAPACCHI S., CONFORT-GOUNY S., GUYE M., SCHAD L. R. “Metabolic counterparts of sodium accumulation in multiple sclerosis: A whole brain 23Na-MRI and fast 1H-MRSI study.”. Multiple Sclerosis Journal. 2017. p. 1352458517736146.

  • DONADIEU M., LE FUR Y., MAAROUF A., GHERIB S., RIDLEY B., PINI L., RAPACCHI S., CONFORT-GOUNY S., GUYE M., SCHAD L. R., MAUDSLEY A. A., PELLETIER J., AUDOIN B., ZAARAOUI W., RANJEVA J. - P. “Metabolic counterparts of sodium accumulation in multiple sclerosis: A whole brain (23)Na-MRI and fast (1)H-MRSI study.”. Multiple Sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England) [En ligne]. 1 October 2017. p. 1352458517736146. Disponible sur : < http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1352458517736146 > (consulté le no date)
    Résumé : BACKGROUND: Increase of brain total sodium concentrations (TSC) is present in multiple sclerosis (MS), but its pathological involvement has not been assessed yet. OBJECTIVE: To determine in vivo the metabolic counterpart of brain sodium accumulation. MATERIALS/METHODS: Whole brain (23)Na-MR imaging and 3D-(1)H-EPSI data were collected in 21 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 20 volunteers. Metabolites and sodium levels were extracted from several regions of grey matter (GM), normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and white matter (WM) T2 lesions. Metabolic and ionic levels expressed as Z-scores have been averaged over the different compartments and used to explain sodium accumulations through stepwise regression models. RESULTS: MS patients showed significant (23)Na accumulations with lower choline and glutamate-glutamine (Glx) levels in GM; (23)Na accumulations with lower N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), Glx levels and higher Myo-Inositol (m-Ins) in NAWM; and higher (23)Na, m-Ins levels with lower NAA in WM T2 lesions. Regression models showed associations of TSC increase with reduced NAA in GM, NAWM and T2 lesions, as well as higher total-creatine, and smaller decrease of m-Ins in T2 lesions. GM Glx levels were associated with clinical scores. CONCLUSION: Increase of TSC in RRMS is mainly related to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction while dysfunction of neuro-glial interactions within GM is linked to clinical scores.
    Mots-clés : 23Na-MRI, crmbm, demyelination, MRSI, Multiple Sclerosis, neurodegeneration, snc, stepwise regression.

  • FATEHI F., SALORT-CAMPANA E., LE TROTER A., LAREAU-TRUDEL E., BYDDER M., FOURé A., GUYE M., BENDAHAN D., ATTARIAN S. “Long-term follow-up of MRI changes in thigh muscles of patients with Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: A quantitative study.”. PloS One [En ligne]. 2017. Vol. 12, n°8, p. e0183825. Disponible sur : < http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183825 > (consulté le no date)
    Résumé : Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common hereditary muscular disorders. Currently FSHD has no known effective treatment and detailed data on the natural history are lacking. Determination of the efficacy of a given therapeutic approach might be difficult in FSHD given the slow and highly variable disease progression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate in vivo the muscle alterations in various neuromuscular disorders. The main aim of the present study was to investigate longitudinally the time-dependent changes occurring in thigh muscles of FSHD patients using quantitative MRI and to assess the potential relationships with the clinical findings. Thirty-five FSHD1 patients (17 females) were enrolled. Clinical assessment tools including manual muscle testing using medical research council score (MRC), and motor function measure (MFM) were recorded each year for a period ranging from 1 to 2 years. For the MRI measurements, we used a new quantitative index, i.e., the mean pixel intensity (MPI) calculated from the pixel-intensity distribution in T1 weighted images. The corresponding MPI scores were calculated for each thigh, for each compartment and for both thighs totally (MPItotal). The total mean pixel intensity (MPItotal) refers to the sum of each pixel signal intensity divided by the corresponding number of pixels. An increased MPItotal indicates both a raised fat infiltration together with a reduced muscle volume thereby illustrating disease progression. Clinical scores did not change significantly over time whereas MPItotal increased significantly from an initial averaged value of 39.6 to 41.1 with a corresponding rate of 0.62/year. While clinical scores and MPItotal measured at the start of the study were significantly related, no correlation was found between the rate of MPItotal and MRC sum score changes, MFMtotal and MFM subscores. The relative rate of MPItotal change was 2.3% (0.5-4.3)/year and was significantly higher than the corresponding rates measured for MRCS 0% (0-1.7) /year and MFMtotal 0% (0-2.0) /year (p = 0.000). On the basis of these results, we suggested that muscle MRI and more particularly the MPItotal index could be used as a reliable biomarker and outcome measure of disease progression. In slowly progressive myopathies such as FSHD, the MPItotal index might reveal subclinical changes, which could not be evidenced using clinical scales over a short period of time.
    Mots-clés : crmbm, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, msk, Muscle, Skeletal, Muscular Dystrophy, Facioscapulohumeral.

  • FOURé A., BENDAHAN D. “Is Branched-Chain Amino Acids Supplementation an Efficient Nutritional Strategy to Alleviate Skeletal Muscle Damage? A Systematic Review.”. Nutrients [En ligne]. 21 September 2017. Vol. 9, n°10,. Disponible sur : < http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu9101047 > (consulté le no date)
    Résumé : Amino acids and more precisely, branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), are usually consumed as nutritional supplements by many athletes and people involved in regular and moderate physical activities regardless of their practice level. BCAAs have been initially shown to increase muscle mass and have also been implicated in the limitation of structural and metabolic alterations associated with exercise damage. This systematic review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature regarding the beneficial effects of BCAAs supplementation within the context of exercise-induced muscle damage or muscle injury. The potential benefit of a BCAAs supplementation was also analyzed according to the supplementation strategy-amount of BCAAs, frequency and duration of the supplementation-and the extent of muscle damage. The review protocol was registered prospectively with Prospective Register for Systematic Reviews (registration number CRD42017073006) and followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Literature search was performed from the date of commencement until August 2017 using four online databases (Medline, Cochrane library, Web of science and ScienceDirect). Original research articles: (i) written in English; (ii) describing experiments performed in Humans who received at least one oral BCAAs supplementation composed of leucine, isoleucine and valine mixture only as a nutritional strategy and (iii) reporting a follow-up of at least one day after exercise-induced muscle damage, were included in the systematic review analysis. Quality assessment was undertaken independently using the Quality Criteria Checklist for Primary Research. Changes in indirect markers of muscle damage were considered as primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures were the extent of change in indirect markers of muscle damage. In total, 11 studies were included in the analysis. A high heterogeneity was found regarding the different outcomes of these studies. The risk of bias was moderate considering the quality ratings were positive for six and neutral for three. Although a small number of studies were included, BCAAs supplementation can be efficacious on outcomes of exercise-induced muscle damage, as long as the extent of muscle damage was low-to-moderate, the supplementation strategy combined a high daily BCAAs intake (>200 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) for a long period of time (>10 days); it was especially effective if taken prior to the damaging exercise.
    Mots-clés : branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), crmbm, exercise-induced muscle damage, msk, nutritional strategy, skeletal muscle.

  • FOURé A., DUHAMEL G., VILMEN C., BENDAHAN D., JUBEAU M., GONDIN J. “Fast measurement of the quadriceps femoris muscle transverse relaxation time at high magnetic field using segmented echo-planar imaging.”. Journal of magnetic resonance imaging: JMRI [En ligne]. February 2017. Vol. 45, n°2, p. 356-368. Disponible sur : < http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.25355 > (consulté le no date)
    Résumé : PURPOSE: To assess and validate a technique for transverse relaxation time (T2 ) measurements of resting and recovering skeletal muscle following exercise with a high temporal resolution and large volume coverage using segmented spin-echo echo-planar imaging (sSE-EPI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experiments were performed on a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner using a multislice sSE-EPI technique applied at different echo times (TEs). T2 measurements were first validated in vitro in calibrated T2 phantoms (range: 25-152 ms) by comparing sSE-EPI, standard spin-echo (SE), and multislice multiecho (MSME) techniques (using a fitting procedure or a 2-TEs calculation). In vivo measurements of resting T2 quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle were performed with both sSE-EPI and MSME sequences. Finally, sSE-EPI was used to quantify T2 changes in recovering muscle after an exercise. RESULTS: T2 values measured in vitro with sSE-EPI were similar to those assessed with SE (P > 0.05). In vitro and in vivo T2 measurements obtained with sSE-EPI were independent of the T2 determination procedure (P > 0.05). In contrast, both in vitro and in vivo T2 values derived from MSME were significantly different when using 2-TEs calculation as compared to the fitting procedure (P < 0.05). sSE-EPI allowed the detection of increased T2 values in the QF muscle immediately after exercise (+14 ± 9%), while lower T2 values were recorded less than 2 min afterwards (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: sSE-EPI sequence is a relevant method to monitor exercise-induced T2 changes of skeletal muscles over large volume coverage and to detect abnormal patterns of muscle activation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:356-368.
    Mots-clés : crmbm, Exercise, MRI, msk, skeletal muscle, spin-echo sequence, T2.

  • FOURNELY M., PETIT Y., WAGNAC É., LAURIN J., CALLOT V., ARNOUX P. - J. “High-speed video analysis improves the accuracy of spinal cord compression measurement in a mouse contusion model.”. Journal of Neuroscience Methods [En ligne]. 15 September 2017. ons of TSC increase with reduced NAA in GM0i/)-:GX" nss_Qging (sSE-EPI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experiments were performed on a 3T magnetic resonance im5lSogressipip_unapi&id=RZIIVQTA&format=rdf_dc">Unqualified Dublin Core RDF |

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    Mots-clés : crmbm, Exercise, MRI, msk, skeletal muscle, spin-ec892368ntry